The Breast Cancer Research Foundation

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Overview

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF), founded in 1993 by the late Evelyn H. Lauder, is The Estée Lauder Companies’ leading partner in The Campaign. It is the highest rated non-profit breast cancer organization in the U.S. dedicated to eradicating breast cancer by advancing the world’s most promising research.

How Does a Donation Support BCRF

  • $25Funds a 1/2 Hour of Research
  • $50Funds 1 hour of Research

Research in Action

Funds raised from The Campaign have supported research grants that will:

  • Improve ways to assess risk in young girls with a family history
  • Pave the way to better biomarkers and targeted therapies to improve breast cancer outcomes and reduce drug resistance
  • Advance our understanding of how to prevent non-invasive pre-cancers from becoming invasive breast cancer
  • Lead to the development of new strategies to improve response to immunotherapies
  • Improve our understanding of weight-loss on the gut microbiome and cancer prevention
  • Lead to better communication between doctors and their patients to reduce psychological stress associated with treatment decisions
  • Aid the development of a blood-based tool to detect metastasis before a tumor can grow
  • Lead to better quality of life for long-term breast cancer survivors
  • Advance our understanding of the genetic landscape of rare forms of breast cancer
  • Advance our understanding of breast cancer disparities and improve delivery of care in Africa

Areas of BCRF-Funded Research

Drug Discovery and Development

These studies focus on bringing better treatment to patients and discovering novel drug
and combination approaches.

Tumor Biology

These studies seek a better understanding of cancer and the tumor microenvironment. They are in the laboratory phase, but may lead to the development of new drugs, biomarkers, or treatments approaches.

Prevention and Metastasis

These studies seek to identify new strategies to prevent drug resistance and breast cancer recurrence that could lead to metastasis.

Prevention: Lifestyle and Environment

These studies are focused on primary prevention of breast cancer.

Global Disparities

These studies seek to improve access to quality care in underserved communities in Africa.

Survivorship

These studies focus on issues that patients face after breast cancer diagnosis and during treatment.

Heredity & Ethnicity

These studies focus on understanding the hereditary factors influencing breast cancer risks and outcomes.

Global Impact

The Campaign is currently active in more than 70 countries. Our global affiliates include but are not limited to the below organizations around the world.


The Breast Cancer Haven and Breast Cancer Care

UK

As well as funding research through BCRF, for several years ELC UK has supported the Breast Cancer Haven, which provides holistic care for women undergoing breast cancer treatment. In 2018, the Evelyn H. Lauder Garden was unveiled at the Haven’s newest centre in the West Midlands, providing a tranquil haven for patients, offering space for yoga, meditation classes and relaxation as well as providing fresh produce for the Centre’s kitchen. ELC UK also provides support to Breast Cancer Care, a group that provides information, support and professional guidance on how to cope with and adjust to life after treatment.

Salvati, FUCAM, Cruz Roja Mexicana, Cruz Rosa Monterrey, Asociación Mexicana de Lucha contra el Cáncer

Mexico

In Mexico, the ELC affiliate supports the work of several organizations, each with unique missions: Salvati, which improves and restores quality of life for cancer patients and their families through specialized therapies, and raises public awareness through projects that promote early detection to decrease risks; FUCAM, which offers diagnosis, treatment and specialized follow-up in breast cancer, especially in the most vulnerable socio-economic and marginalized groups in Mexico, and promotes education about early detection; Cruz Roja Mexicana and Cruz Rosa Monterrey, which supports low-income women diagnosed with cancer and their families in a specialized shelter where they are given accommodation, food, psychological and spiritual care; and Asociación Mexicana de Lucha contra el Cáncer, which implements a comprehensive support system of information, timely detection and breast cancer care follow-up, aimed for low-income women of marginalized communities. Through the work of The Breast Cancer Campaign, ELC Mexico has donated $15,182,490 (MXN) and also supported more than 30 scholarship grants for radiologists.

Medical Oncology Ward

South Africa

In support of the 25th anniversary of The Breast Cancer Campaign, ELC SA initiated a fundraising project to visually improve the Medical Oncology Ward at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital. This public hospital services those without medical insurance and the oncology ward sees over 3,500 people per year. The ward received much needed visual improvement which included painting, new blinds, and furniture for patients undergoing cancer treatment, transforming it into an uplifting, comfortable clinic space for the people it serviced. It has made a lasting impact and contribution to the community, and the ELC SA affiliate looks forward to continuing to support the hospital and community.

The Italian Association for Cancer Research

Italy

ELC Italy supports The Italian Association for Cancer Research (Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro, or AIRC), which was founded in 1965. Since its inception, AIRC has been committed to fostering cancer research in Italy. For the past three years, ELC Italy supported AIRC’s research projects on breast cancer in Italy, raising awareness on the latest progress in the field and promoting a culture of prevention.

Brest Friends Al Jalila

Middle East

For over five years, the ELC Middle East affiliate has supported Brest Friends Al Jalila, whose mission is to increase awareness of breast cancer amongst women of the United Arab Emirates. Brest Friends Al Jalila also operates the only breast cancer support group in Dubai, offering breast cancer patients, survivors and their families a vital network of advice, care and friendship. The organization is a champion of issues relating to accessibility of treatment for breast cancer, such as helping patients from all backgrounds navigate language and cultural barriers, transportation to treatment centers and provision of advice on health insurance.

Incancer Foundation

Chile

ELC Chile has been supporting the Incancer Foundation for the last 14 years. The non-profit’s three main pillars are service, teaching and research. Incancer aims to increase the financial resources of the National Cancer Institute (public hospital), whose mission is to provide comprehensive care to cancer patients who depend on the public system by offering personalized attention to patients and their families. The funding provided every year by The Breast Cancer Campaign to Incancer specifically supports more than 1,200 mammograms for women who are not covered by the public health system. Inspired by The Estée Lauder Companies BCC Chilean team, an agreement of permanent assistance endorsed by the Minister of Health was signed between the National Cancer Institute and the Easter Island Hospital.

Korea CancerSociety (KCS)

Korea

Korea Cancer Society (KCS), established in 1966, aims to prevent, eradicate and help defeat cancers by educating the public through various programs and initiatives to provide accurate information about cancers. ELC Korea has supported KCS since 2001 when the Breast Cancer Campaign first started in Korea, through donations and partnership. The donated funds to KCS have been used to carry out annual public engagement events or programs to educate the Korean public about breast cancer in order to increase early detection rates, while enhancing overall understanding of the disease. In particular, since 2013 the public campaign programs/events have focused on highlighting the importance of taking tangible actions to prevent and defeat breast cancer.

Shanghai Anti-cancer Development Foundation and Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center

China

Since 2011, ELC China has been in close collaboration with the Shanghai Anti-cancer Development Foundation. Since then, ELC has donated each year to the Foundation’s Pink Ribbon Poverty Fund to subsidize patients who get medical treatment at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and can’t afford the cost. To date, a total of 479 patients have benefitted from the project.

The National Breast Cancer Foundation, Garvan Instituteof Medical Research, Breast Cancer Network Australia, and Cancer Patient’s Foundation

Australia

For the past 24 years, ELC has been committed to making a difference in the fight against breast cancer in Australia. Currently, four NGOs are supported by The Breast Cancer Campaign in the country: The National Breast Cancer Foundation, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Breast Cancer Network Australia and Cancer Patient’s Foundation. All of these organizations make a unique contribution, from providing support to patients and creating new educational resources to continuously conduct research.

Taiwan Clinical Oncology Research Foundation

Taiwan

For more than 20 years, the Taiwan affiliate has supported the Taiwan Clinical Oncology Research Foundation , donating over $1.5 million (US) and helping more than 40,000 beneficiaries through its various programs. ELC Taiwan’s support has helped the foundation purchase two portable ultrasound screening devices and offer free breast ultrasound screening services for more than 34,000 individuals, of whom 5,419 had abnormal findings.

Look Good Feel Better

Look Good Feel Better (LGFB) is a non-medical, brand-neutral public service program that teaches beauty techniques to people with cancer to help them manage the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment. The program includes lessons on skin and nail care, cosmetics, wigs and turbans, accessories and styling, helping people with cancer to find some normalcy in a life that is by no means normal.

In addition to LGFB’s work in the US that is supported by The Estée Lauder Companies, the Look Good Feel Better Foundation oversees a global network of licensed affiliates that deliver LGFB support programs in countries across the globe. Fourteen of The Estée Lauder Companies’ affiliates partner with their respective local LGFB programs: Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom.

2017-2018 BCRF Researchers

Drug Discovery and Development

These studies focus on bringing better treatment to patients and discovering novel drug and combination approaches.

Karen Anderson, MD, PhD

Associate Professor
Biodesign Institute of Arizona State University

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Karen Anderson, MD, PhD

Associate Professor
Biodesign Institute of Arizona State University

Targeted immunotherapy with a new class of drugs called checkpoint inhibitors has been effective in a subset of patients with solid tumors, including some triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). However, most TNBC patients do not respond. Cancer vaccines can enhance anti-tumor immunity and may improve the effectiveness of these drugs. The focus of KAREN ANDERSON, MD, PhD, Associate Professor at The Biodesign Institute of Arizona State University, and her team’s BCRF research is to identify target proteins for breast cancer vaccine development, with a long-range goal to deliver vaccines to reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence after surgery. Dr. Anderson’s research is breaking ground in developing vaccines that may improve response to checkpoint inhibitors in triple negative and other breast cancers.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing, Distribution and Research and Development Centers Awards

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Jill Bargonetti, PhD

Chair, Molecular, Cellular and Development PhD Subprogram in Biology
City University of New York Graduate Center

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Jill Bargonetti, PhD

Chair, Molecular, Cellular and Development PhD Subprogram in Biology
City University of New York Graduate Center

JILL BARGONETTI, PhD chairs the Molecular, Cellular and Development PhD Subprogram in Biology at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Her team focuses on two of the most critical drivers of breast cancer, MDM2 and p53. In the last year, Dr. Bargonetti’s team linked p53 mutation to PARP inhibitor treatment in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). This year they will confirm these findings, while continuing their work on finding new MDM2-based targets for ER+ breast cancers. This work can have significant impact in expanding the use of PARP inhibitors to more TNBC patients.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Lewis C. Cantley, PhD

Director, Sandra and Edward Meyer
Cancer Center, Weill Cornell
Medical College

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Lewis C. Cantley, PhD

Director, Sandra and Edward Meyer
Cancer Center, Weill Cornell
Medical College

The research by LEWIS C. CANTLEY, PhD, the Director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medical College, focuses on identifying new treatment strategies for triple-negative breast cancer. In the coming year his team will build upon their previous work and expand on their precision medicine approach to identify effective treatment strategies for each individual tumor. One important focus will be understanding how best to utilize this information to ultimately extend the lives of more patients.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Elizabeth Jaffee, MD

Professor of Oncology
John Hopkins University

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Elizabeth Jaffee, MD

Professor of Oncology
John Hopkins University

Drugs called checkpoint inhibitors prevent tumor cells from shutting down the body’s natural immune response to the tumor. These therapies have produced tumor responses in a broad range of tumors, but the majority of breast cancer patients do not respond to the therapy. This may be due to a lack of specialized immune cells (called T cells) at the tumor sites. Combination strategies that increase T cells are needed for successful immunotherapy in breast cancer. ELIZABETH JAFFEE, MD and LEISHA EMENS, MD, PhD, Professors of Oncology at John Hopkins University, will test the combination of trastuzumab (Herceptin®) and an immune targeted drug to enhance the immune response in HER2+ breast cancer. The goal is to develop a highly active immunotherapy regimen for treatment of recurrent HER2+ breast cancer that has become resistant to anti-HER2 therapies.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Clinique Awards

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Carl Haney

Leisha Emens, MD, PhD

Professor of Oncology
John Hopkins University

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Leisha Emens, MD, PhD

Professor of Oncology
John Hopkins University

Drugs called checkpoint inhibitors prevent tumor cells from shutting down the body’s natural immune response to the tumor. These therapies have produced tumor responses in a broad range of tumors, but the majority of breast cancer patients do not respond to the therapy. This may be due to a lack of specialized immune cells (called T cells) at the tumor sites. Combination strategies that increase T cells are needed for successful immunotherapy in breast cancer. ELIZABETH JAFFEE, MD and LEISHA EMENS, MD, PhD, Professors of Oncology at John Hopkins University, will test the combination of trastuzumab (Herceptin®) and an immune targeted drug to enhance the immune response in HER2+ breast cancer. The goal is to develop a highly active immunotherapy regimen for treatment of recurrent HER2+ breast cancer that has become resistant to anti-HER2 therapies.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Clinique Awards

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Xiaole Liu, PhD

Co-Director, Center for Functional
Cancer Epigenetics at Dana-Farber
Cancer Institute

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Xiaole Liu, PhD

Co-Director, Center for Functional
Cancer Epigenetics at Dana-Farber
Cancer Institute

Robust biomarkers for immunotherapy response are lacking, and XIAOLE LIU, PhD, Co-Director, Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and her team have developed a computational model of tumor immune evasion, called «TIDE» (Tumor Immune Dysfunction and Exclusion), which measures the immunogenicity of tumors–a prediction of how well they will respond to immunotherapy. Using TIDE, Dr. Liu and her team have shown that blocking some tumor-promoting genes with targeted therapies could improve response to immunotherapy. This year, they will conduct a state-of-art genetic screening in experimental models to validate these targets to increase response to immunotherapy in TNBC tumors. These studies will not only identify potential biomarkers for immunotherapy response, but will also reveal novel therapeutic targets to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy in treating TNBC.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Tumor Biology

Julienne E. Bower, PhD

Associate Professor
UCLA

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Julienne E. Bower, PhD

Associate Professor
UCLA

In a unique collaboration at UCLA, Associate Professors JULIENNE E. BOWER, PhD and STEVEN W. COLE, PhD, are studying the role that stress and the immune system play in cancer. They recently showed that reducing the levels of stress lowered inflammation markers in breast cancer survivors. This year, the team will extend these findings and define the impact of these interactions on tumor biology. This work has the potential to identify neural processes that regulate tumor growth, progression, and recurrence.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Clinique Awards

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Steven W. Cole, PhD

Associate Professor
UCLA

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Steven W. Cole, PhD

Associate Professor
UCLA

In a unique collaboration at UCLA, Associate Professors JULIENNE E. BOWER, PhD and STEVEN W. COLE, PhD, are studying the role that stress and the immune system play in cancer. They recently showed that reducing the levels of stress lowered inflammation markers in breast cancer survivors. This year, the team will extend these findings and define the impact of these interactions on tumor biology. This work has the potential to identify neural processes that regulate tumor growth, progression, and recurrence.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Clinique Awards

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H. Shelton Earp, MD

Director, Cancer Care at the Lineberger
Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

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H. Shelton Earp, MD

Director, Cancer Care at the Lineberger
Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

H. SHELTON EARP, MD, Director of Cancer Care at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, is studying genes that regulate tumor growth. Dr. Earp’s team identified new therapeutic targets to prevent resistance to chemotherapy. In the coming year, the team will expand these studies to test novel approaches to achieve the most effective anti-breast cancer immune response in their experimental models. Collectively, Dr. Earp’s BCRF research has helped to identify potential new targets for drug development, as well as strategies to stimulate anti-tumor activity by the body’s own immune system.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Awards

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Jorge Reis-Filho, MD, PhD

Director, Experimental Pathology
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

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Jorge Reis-Filho, MD, PhD

Director, Experimental Pathology
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Breast cancer is not a single disease. At least 20 different types of invasive breast cancer have been defined based on the size, shape, and growth pattern of the cancer cells. The most common and most studied type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma, which accounts for up to 75 percent of cases. Traditional genetics approaches have resulted in identification of the drivers of a few rare breast cancer types. In this project, JORGE REIS-FILHO, MD, PhD, FRCPath, Director of Experimental Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, will analyze the entire DNA code and the biological mechanisms that switch genes on and off (called epigenetic alterations) in special types of breast cancers for which no drivers have been identified. This project has the potential to molecularly classify rare breast cancers and devise markers to improve the diagnostic reproducibility of special types of the disease and may also identify actionable molecular alterations to tailor the treatment of breast cancer patients.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing, Distribution and Research and Development Centers Awards

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Michael Wigler, PhD

Professor, Cancer Genetics
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Michael Wigler, PhD

Professor, Cancer Genetics
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

MICHAEL WIGLER, PhD, Professor of Cancer Genetics at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, is working to characterize the interaction between normal cells and tumor cells that will inform new strategies to prevent or treat breast cancer. Dr. Wigler’s team employs sophisticated cell sorting and sequencing technology coupled to bioinformatics to analyze the activity of genes in cells from the normal tissue (the tumor microenvironment) and the tumor. Dr. Wigler believes that these experiments will demonstrate that the tissue environment both assists and fights tumor development and growth. Understanding this relationship can identify those interactions that improve or worsen outcome, and inform new approaches to achieve a better outcome for patients.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Play for P.I.N.K. Award/ The Estée Lauder Companies’ Breast Cancer Campaign Award

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Jenny C. Chang, MD

Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell
Medical College and Director, Cancer
Center, The Methodist Hospital,
Houston Methodist Research Institute

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Jenny C. Chang, MD

Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell
Medical College and Director, Cancer
Center, The Methodist Hospital,
Houston Methodist Research Institute

There is a renewed excitement about immune-therapies for treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), but more work needs to be done to advance this field to find more effective therapies for this aggressive form of breast cancer. JENNY C. CHANG, MD, Professor of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College and Director of the Cancer Center at The Methodist Hospital, Houston Methodist Research Institute in Houston, TX, is working to better understand how immune-therapies work in TNBC. Her lab has identified a potential target that may enhance response to these therapies. In her current studies, Dr. Chang will test new combination therapies to enhance response to immunotherapy in TNBC.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Awards

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Global Disparities

Dr. Funmi I. Olopade, MB, BS, FACP

Nigeria Breast Cancer Study (NBCS)
University of Chicago

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Dr. Funmi I. Olopade, MB, BS, FACP

Nigeria Breast Cancer Study (NBCS)
University of Chicago

There is a lack of knowledge that could otherwise save the lives of women of African ancestry in the U.S. and across the African Diaspora. Dr. FUNMI I. OLOPADE, MB, BS, FACP and her University of Chicago colleagues have made tremendous progress in closing this knowledge gap through ther Nigeria Breast Cancer Study (NBCS). Dr. Olopade’s team has conducted studies highlighting cancer risk factors particular to African populations, and have thus far illuminated the burden of breast cancer among young women, especially those with BCRA-associated breast cancers. This year, the team will train Nigerian Oncologists on how to improve the quality of care through research and offer patients more personalized treatment approaches. These efforts will help to develop a strong clinical research infrastructure, which can be used to further strengthen the country’s capacity to address and respond to emerging cancer care needs.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Lawrence Shulman, MD

Deputy Director, Clinical Services
University of Pennsylvania

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Lawrence Shulman, MD

Deputy Director, Clinical Services
University of Pennsylvania

Breast cancer is a major public health concern in low and middle-income countries such as Rwanda, where women have a much higher risk of dying, in part because of delayed diagnoses and late-stage disease. With continued funding from BCRF, LAWRENCE SHULMAN, MD, Deputy Director of Clinical Services at the University of Pennsylvania and BCRF co-investigator, THARCISSE MPUNGA, Medical Director, Butaro Hospital, have launched a pilot program to promote early detection of breast cancer in the remote Burera District of Rwanda. In the coming year, the research team will expand the intervention to other health centers in the district. These efforts will further build capacity to efficiently evaluate and care for the growing number of women with breast concerns who come to the Butaro Hospital. The researchers envision this program as a model for early detection efforts throughout Rwanda and the region.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing, Distribution and Research and Development Centers Awards

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Prevention: Lifestyle and Environment

Regina M. Santella, PhD

Professor, Columbia University
Mailman School of Public Health

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Regina M. Santella, PhD

Professor, Columbia University
Mailman School of Public Health

Understanding the impact of environmental exposures on cancer risk is an arduous task. Because multiple exposures occur over a lifetime, it is very difficult to link a specific chemical exposure to cancer. REGINA M. SANTELLA, PhD and MARY BETH TERRY, PhD, Professors at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, are examining breast cancer risk factors in a cohort of women from high-risk families. Utilizing the Breast Cancer Family Registry, they are comparing levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), common environmental pollutants, in blood from women who go on to get breast cancer to those who remained cancer free. They will expand these studies in Taiwan where breast cancer incidence has risen by more than 50 percent in the last decade. The goal is to identify new biomarkers to improve risk prediction.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Aveda Award

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Mary Beth Terry, PhD

Professor, Columbia University,
Mailman School of Public Health

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Mary Beth Terry, PhD

Professor, Columbia University,
Mailman School of Public Health

Understanding the impact of environmental exposures on cancer risk is an arduous task. Because multiple exposures occur over a lifetime, it is very difficult to link a specific chemical exposure to cancer. REGINA M. SANTELLA, PhD and MARY BETH TERRY, PhD, Professors at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, are examining breast cancer risk factors in a cohort of women from high-risk families. Utilizing the Breast Cancer Family Registry, they are comparing levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), common environmental pollutants, in blood from women who go on to get breast cancer to those who remained cancer free. They will expand these studies in Taiwan where breast cancer incidence has risen by more than 50 percent in the last decade. The goal is to identify new biomarkers to improve risk prediction.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Aveda Award

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Vered Stearns, MD

Co-Director, Breast Cancer Program
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer
Center, Johns Hopkins University

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Vered Stearns, MD

Co-Director, Breast Cancer Program
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer
Center, Johns Hopkins University

It is well known that lifestyle, particularly factors that lead to obesity, can influence breast cancer risk. Recent studies have shown that the gut microbiome (the bacteria in the human digestive tract) influences human health and many diseases including breast and other cancers. VERED STEARNS, MD, Co-Director of the Breast Cancer Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University, is conducting a study to assess how weight-loss in overweight and obese patients alters the gut microbiome diversity and metabolism. The results from this pilot study will be used to design new studies and to implement new weight loss interventions for breast cancer patients.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Awards

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Prevention and Metastasis

Monica Fornier, MD

Medical Oncologist, Memorial
Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center,
and Assistant Professor,
Weill Cornell Medical College

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Monica Fornier, MD

Medical Oncologist, Memorial
Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center,
and Assistant Professor,
Weill Cornell Medical College

MONICA FORNIER, MD, is a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and an Assistant Professor at Weill Cornell Medical College. Her research is focused on small molecules known as metabolites, which can be detected in the blood. Dr. Fornier and her international colleague, LAURA BIGANZOLI, MD of the Hospital Prato, Instituto Tuscano Tumori Italy, are assessing the benefit of combining metabolomic risk analysis with existing risk prediction models such as OncotypeDX or AdjuvantOnline. In the last year, they completed a study including 730 blood samples from patients with early breast cancer, and 109 samples from patients with metastatic disease, from two trials run in South-east Asia. They were able to detect metabolic signals in the blood of women about to undergo surgery for breast cancer that predicted a higher risk of relapse. The hope is that by improving risk prediction, doctors can personalize treatment for individual women, sparing those at low risk from unnecessary therapy.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ North America Manufacturing, Distribution and Research and Development Centers Awards

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Thomas A. Rohan, MD, PhD

Professor and Chairman, Department of
Epidemiology and Population Health,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

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Thomas A. Rohan, MD, PhD

Professor and Chairman, Department of
Epidemiology and Population Health,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Many women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, a non-invasive precursor of breast cancer) are over treated, highlighting the need to identify those who are most likely to progress to invasive cancer. THOMAS A. ROHAN, MD, PhD, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, has collected information on a wide range of factors that potentially influence risk of progression from DCIS to invasive breast cancer. This year, Dr. Rohan and colleagues are analyzing data from of a two-stage study of almost 4,000 women to identify tumor markers related to risk of metastasis. The goal of this work is to lay the groundwork for a study to identify gene expression patterns that predispose to the development of subsequent invasive breast cancer.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Fabrice André, MD, PhD

Professor of Medical Oncology,
Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France

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Fabrice André, MD, PhD

Professor of Medical Oncology,
Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France

The discovery that each breast cancer has a unique pattern of genomic alterations has led to the development of new “targeted” treatments. Some breast cancers, however, are resistant to these treatments. The goal of BCRF grantee FABRICE ANDRÉ, MD, PhD, Professor of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France, is to counteract drug resistance with more personalized therapies by identifying genes involved in the development of breast cancer and potential new drug combinations. In the coming year, Dr. André and his team will study the genome in 300 patients with metastatic breast cancer in order to identify new targets to prevent or treat metastases.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Mitch Dowsett, PhD, BSC

Professor, The Royal Marsden Hospital
and Institute of Cancer Research, London

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Mitch Dowsett, PhD, BSC

Professor, The Royal Marsden Hospital
and Institute of Cancer Research, London

Estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer makes up more than two-thirds of all breast cancer cases. While anti-estrogen drugs have been very effective in treating ER+ breast cancer, resistance to these therapies remains a significant clinical challenge. MITCH DOWSETT, PhD, BSC, and IAN E. SMITH, MD, FRCP, FRCPE, Professors at The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research in London, are using a new clinical trial platform called POETIC-2 to identify potential combinations of anti-estrogen drugs and targeted therapies to prevent endocrine resistance in individual patients. In the next year, they will launch the next phase of POETIC-2. These studies will help to refine current predictive signatures so that patients with ER+ breast cancer can receive the most effective therapy.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brand Award in Honor of Elizabeth Hurley

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Ian E. Smith, MD, FRCP, FRCPE

Professor, The Royal Marsden Hospital,
and Institute of Cancer Research, London

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Ian E. Smith, MD, FRCP, FRCPE

Professor, The Royal Marsden Hospital,
and Institute of Cancer Research, London

Estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer makes up more than two-thirds of all breast cancer cases. While anti-estrogen drugs have been very effective in treating ER+ breast cancer, resistance to these therapies remains a significant clinical challenge. MITCH DOWSETT, PhD, BSC, and IAN E. SMITH, MD, FRCP, FRCPE, Professors at The Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research in London, are using a new clinical trial platform called POETIC-2 to identify potential combinations of anti-estrogen drugs and targeted therapies to prevent endocrine resistance in individual patients. In the next year, they will launch the next phase of POETIC-2. These studies will help to refine current predictive signatures so that patients with ER+ breast cancer can receive the most effective therapy.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brand Award in Honor of Elizabeth Hurley

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David Rimm, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Pathology and
Director, Pathology Tissue Services and
Translational Science in Pathology
Yale University School of Medicine

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David Rimm, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Pathology and
Director, Pathology Tissue Services and
Translational Science in Pathology
Yale University School of Medicine

Trastuzumab (Herceptin) has been one of the most effective drugs in management of HER2- positive breast cancer, but recurrence after traztuzumab therapy affects about 10-15 percent of patients. The addition of a second HER2 drug called lapatinib can help some women, but doctors do not know which women will or will not benefit. DAVID RIMM, MD, PhD, Professor of the Department of Pathology and Director of the Pathology Tissue Services and Translational Science in Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine, is conducting studies to devise a way to determine which women are likely to benefit from the addition of lapatinib, thus reducing recurrence rates and individualizing breast cancer care. This year, Dr. Rimm will use the tissue obtained from patients enrolled in a large clinical trial to better understand why some tumors do not respond to trastuzumab.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Survivorship

Patricia A. Ganz, MD

BCRF Scientific Advisor and Director,
Cancer Prevention & Control Research,
UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive
Cancer Center

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Patricia A. Ganz, MD

BCRF Scientific Advisor and Director,
Cancer Prevention & Control Research,
UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive
Cancer Center

Many breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy and hormonal therapy experience some loss of brain function, a condition sometimes called “chemobrain.” PATRICIA A. GANZ, MD, a BCRF Scientific Advisor and the Director of Cancer Prevention & Control Research at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, is conducting research to improve memory and concentration in breast cancer survivors. Dr. Ganz and her colleagues have continued to study a group of women after the end of treatment, and their reports have provided a rich source of information that has been helpful to patients and clinicians in understanding what to expect after treatment. This year they will conduct additional analyses from the study database and are planning for a large treatment trial to help women improve their memory and thinking if they are having problems. A new focus is to learn about the extent to which breast cancer treatments may accelerate the development of age-related cognitive decline, e.g., an intensively treated 50-year-old breast cancer patient may have the cognitive age of a 65-year-old healthy woman.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Awards

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Dame Lesley Fallowfield, DBE,
BSc, DPhil, FMedSci

Professor, Psycho-oncology at Brighton
& Sussex Medical School,
University of Sussex, and Director,
Sussex Health Outcomes Research &
Education in Cancer (SHORE-C) group

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Dame Lesley Fallowfield, DBE,
BSc, DPhil, FMedSci

Professor, Psycho-oncology at Brighton
& Sussex Medical School,
University of Sussex, and Director,
Sussex Health Outcomes Research &
Education in Cancer (SHORE-C) group

It is normal for breast cancer patients to experience some psychological stress. Communication about treatment options in early stage breast cancer can be difficult for doctors and increase patients’ stress. DAME LESLEY FALLOWFIELD, DBE, BSc, DPhil, FMedSci is a Professor of Psycho-oncology at Brighton & Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, where she is the Director of the Sussex Health Outcomes Research & Education in Cancer (SHORE-C) group. This year, Dr. Fallowfield’s team will conduct workshops to help doctors think about how they talk about risk with patients, and how to ensure patients understand their treatment options. The goal is produce positive changes in healthcare professionals’ communication skills, and to make the learning materials freely available to facilitators and educational organizations throughout the world.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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Heredity & Ethnicity

Katherine Nathanson, MD

Deputy Director, Abramason Cancer
Center at the University of Pennsylvania

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Katherine Nathanson, MD

Deputy Director, Abramason Cancer
Center at the University of Pennsylvania

KATHERINE NATHANSON, MD, Deputy Director of Abramason Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, is conducting studies that will help to explain the contribution of mutations in multiple genes to breast cancer susceptibility. Although much of her research involves BRCA1 and BRCA2, the most commonly mutated genes in hereditary breast cancer, her current work includes understanding the role of other genes as well. Her goal is to evaluate how less common gene mutations contribute to risk of breast cancer, particularly in women who are diagnosed at a young age (under 40) or have a strong family history of the disease.

Their research is generously made possible by:

The Estée Lauder Companies’ Brands Awards in Memory of Evelyn H. Lauder

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